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Sunday, July 11, 2010

The Calcium Cholesterol Connection


If you think taking supplemental calcium is only good for bone health, think again. Calcium is a multifaceted nutrient. It happens to be the most abundant mineral in our bodies.
Aside from its well-known role in promoting bone health, calcium is important for maximizing enzyme activity, facilitating nerve function, and helping to regulate heart rhythm and muscle contraction. Low calcium intake has not only been associated with poor bone health, but may also contribute to poor blood pressure and even abnormal cell growth.
The benefit of calcium now appears to extend to a completely new arena, which is cholesterol metabolism. In a recent study published in the American Journal of Medicine, 223 women were randomly assigned to take either 1 gram (1,000 mg) of calcium daily in the form of calcium citrate or an inactive placebo for one year1.
Investigators measured levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and HDL (good) cholesterol at the onset of study, and then again periodically over the 12-month period. At the end of the trial, both HDL cholesterol and HDL-to-LDL ratios had increased more for women taking the calcium supplement compared to those taking placebo.
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On average, women taking calcium saw an increase in HDL cholesterol levels of about 7%. Authors indicated that this is another reason to encourage postmenopausal women to take calcium. Further studies are suggested to see if similar benefits are obtained with men, and whether or not calcium supplementation may affect cardiovascular health.
The Right Form of Calcium is CriticalWhen taking calcium it's important to use the right form. Studies show that calcium carbonate has variable absorption, depending on stomach pH. Calcium citrate malate is believed to be most efficiently absorbed in the stomach and intestines.
There may actually be as much as a 1000% increase in absorption rates with calcium citrate malate compared to other forms of calcium. Evidence supporting the incredible benefits of calcium citrate malate was published on September 4, 1997 in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine2.
Several hundred elderly patients were studied. Half were given 500 mg elemental calcium citrate malate with 700 IU vitamin D, and the other half was given placebo. The results were excellent. Calcium/vitamin D supplements improved bone health and appeared to reduce fracture rates by more than 50%.
In addition, certain forms of calcium other than calcium citrate malate may contain toxic heavy metals. The worst offenders are carbonate (especially oyster shells, a common form). It's very important to take magnesium in addition to calcium supplements.
Most people consume only about half of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA)/Daily Values (DV) of magnesium in their diets. Low levels of magnesium may lead to poor bone and cardiovascular health.
For more information visit: http://www.hypercet.com
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Saturday, July 3, 2010

Real time stat from blogger

Blogger.com, which is one of the best platform blog, finally launched a real-time stat for blogger which is very sophisticated. the best part is, users do not need to install a blogger any code into his blog.
Your blog visitors can be tracked from where and using what keywords. Almost the same with google analytics. You can also find the posting of the most popular and most widely invites visitors to your blog.


real time stat for blogger

But, the blogger has not officially released this new appearance. still in blogger in draft form, but this new feature will soon be officially launched by the company.




With capabilities such as google analytics but without entering any code. would not that be great?

You want to try real-time stat from blogger in draft to your blog?? Just click Blogger in Draft and select new tabs "Stats"



Blogger in Draft

What is your opinion about this new feature?
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Saturday, June 26, 2010

Magnesium and your health

Your body only contains 4-5 teaspoons of magnesium, but it is extremely vital to every cell and your body as a whole. Magnesium works to support your bones, helps in the production of cholesterol, helps to activate many vitamins, aids in relaxing muscles, and is an essential factor in protein synthesis.About 60-65% of the magnesium in your body in contained in the bones. Your bones hold on to magnesium pretty tightly.

Even when the rest of your body has a deficiency, your bones will keep most of their magnesium. Only in situations of extreme deficiency will your bones give up their magnesium. Without magnesium, your bones would becomes spongy and could not support the weight of your body. Cholesterol cannot be synthesized without magnesium. Bile, which helps your body digest fats, cannot be produced without cholesterol.

Cholesterol is also a vital component of many hormones. Aldosterone is one such hormone, and helps to control the balance of minerals, one of them being magnesium. Aldosterone needs magnesium to be produced and it also regulates magnesium's balance.

Cholesterol is also needed in the production of sex hormones, to keep your reproductive system working correctly. The stress coping hormones produced by your adrenal glands also require cholesterol for their synthesis. Cholesterol, along with lecithin and fatty acids (both require magnesium for their formation), are the main components of the myelin lining on the nerves.

Myelin protects the nerves from "cross wiring", and helps the nerve impulses to travel faster. Without adequate magnesium to produce these three lipids, your nerves can become ragged and worn out before their time.

Magnesium has a calming effect on your nervous system. In fact, when taken in large enough doses, magnesium can have an anesthetizing effect.Magnesium also has a calming effect on your muscles. Calcium stimulates the muscles to flex, and magnesium relaxes them.

Without this relaxing effect, your muscles would cramp up. You may also experience muscle spasms and even convulsions, if you don't get enough magnesium. Remember that your heart is a muscle, and the last thing you want is for it to spasm.

Magnesium can prevent painful contractions at the end of pregnancy. It also helps to avoid eclampsia, which is convulsions and coma experienced by the mother after some deliveries.Magnesium activates vitamins C and E.

Therefore, if you don't get enough magnesium, the vitamin C and E that you eat cannot be used, and your body would suffer symptoms of deficiency for those vitamins as well. Magnesium is vital to the production of parathormone, which regulates vitamin D synthesis from cholesterol compounds in your skin. The B complex also requires magnesium for their proper functioning.

Amino acids are the smallest component of protein. Magnesium is needed to properly produce and combine amino acids to make the specific proteins your body needs. Many of the body's hormones, enzymes, and tissues are made of protein.

Your body has to produce a lot of each to keep your body running smoothly. The constant repair of your body requires massive amounts of protein to be produced. Without magnesium, your body could not heal itself on the outside or inside. Thousands and thousands of cells in your skin die every day. Much protein is needed to keep it looking firm and beautiful.

Your blood is dependent on magnesium to supply it with new proteins, some of which help to kill infectious bacteria and viruses.DNA is also protein. Without DNA, life would be impossible; it is the instruction book of your cells. We are constantly reproducing DNA in the replication of cells.

If we could not produce DNA, we would die in a few days, if not a matter of hours. The replication of DNA allows us to have offspring. Without magnesium, we could not reproduce. Magnesium helps to digest the DNA from the cells in plant or meat foods that we eat.

For more information visit: http://www.hypercet.com/

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Malic Acid for High Blood Pressure

Malic acid is a naturally occurring compound that plays a role in the complex process of deriving adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy currency that runs the body) from food.

Where is it found?Malic acid is found in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, but the richest source is apples, which is why malic acid is sometimes referred to as “apple acid.”

Malic acid has been used in connection with the following conditions (refer to the individual health concern for complete information): Science Ratings Health Concerns FibromyalgiaWho is likely to be deficient?A deficiency in humans is unlikely, since the body can produce malic acid.

How much is usually taken?Healthy people do not need to take malic acid as a supplement. Research has been conducted with 1,200–2,400 mg of malic acid in combination with 300–600 mg of elemental magnesium.Are there any side effects or interactions?

Current research does not indicate any adverse effects from the use of malic acid in moderate amounts.At the time of writing, there were no well-known drug interactions with malic acid.

For more information visit: http://www.hypercet.com

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The Calcium Cholesterol Connection

If you think taking supplemental calcium is only good for bone health, think again. Calcium is a multifaceted nutrient. It happens to be the most abundant mineral in our bodies. Aside from its well-known role in promoting bone health, calcium is important for maximizing enzyme activity, facilitating nerve function, and helping to regulate heart rhythm and muscle contraction. Low calcium intake has not only been associated with poor bone health, but may also contribute to poor blood pressure and even abnormal cell growth.

The benefit of calcium now appears to extend to a completely new arena, which is cholesterol metabolism. In a recent study published in the American Journal of Medicine, 223 women were randomly assigned to take either 1 gram (1,000 mg) of calcium daily in the form of calcium citrate or an inactive placebo for one year1.

Investigators measured levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and HDL (good) cholesterol at the onset of study, and then again periodically over the 12-month period. At the end of the trial, both HDL cholesterol and HDL-to-LDL ratios had increased more for women taking the calcium supplement compared to those taking placebo.

On average, women taking calcium saw an increase in HDL cholesterol levels of about 7%. Authors indicated that this is another reason to encourage postmenopausal women to take calcium. Further studies are suggested to see if similar benefits are obtained with men, and whether or not calcium supplementation may affect cardiovascular health.

The Right Form of Calcium is CriticalWhen taking calcium it's important to use the right form. Studies show that calcium carbonate has variable absorption, depending on stomach pH. Calcium citrate malate is believed to be most efficiently absorbed in the stomach and intestines.

There may actually be as much as a 1000% increase in absorption rates with calcium citrate malate compared to other forms of calcium. Evidence supporting the incredible benefits of calcium citrate malate was published on September 4, 1997 in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine2. Several hundred elderly patients were studied.

Half were given 500 mg elemental calcium citrate malate with 700 IU vitamin D, and the other half was given placebo. The results were excellent. Calcium/vitamin D supplements improved bone health and appeared to reduce fracture rates by more than 50%.

In addition, certain forms of calcium other than calcium citrate malate may contain toxic heavy metals. The worst offenders are carbonate (especially oyster shells, a common form). It's very important to take magnesium in addition to calcium supplements.

Most people consume only about half of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA)/Daily Values (DV) of magnesium in their diets. Low levels of magnesium may lead to poor bone and cardiovascular health.

For more information visit: http://www.hypercet.com

Read More...

What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a sterol (a combination steroid and alcohol). Cholesterol is a lipid found in the cell membranes of all tissues, and it is transported in the blood plasma of all animals. Because cholesterol is synthesized by all eukaryotes, trace amounts of cholesterol are also found in membranes of plants and fungi.

The name originates from the Greek chole- (bile) and stereos (solid), and the chemical suffix -ol for an alcohol, as researchers first identified cholesterol in solid form in gallstones by François Poulletier de la Salle in 1769. However, it is only in 1815 that chemist Eugène Chevreul named the compound "cholesterine".[2]

Most of the cholesterol is synthesized by the body and some has dietary origin. Cholesterol is more abundant in tissues which either synthesize more or have more abundant densely-packed membranes, for example, the liver, spinal cord and brain. It plays a central role in many biochemical processes, such as the composition of cell membranes and the synthesis of steroid hormones.

Cholesterol is insoluble in blood, but is transported in the circulatory system bound to one of the varieties of lipoprotein, spherical particles which have an exterior composed mainly of water-soluble proteins. The main types, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) carry cholesterol from and to the liver.

According to the lipid hypothesis, abnormally high cholesterol levels (hypercholesterolemia) and abnormal proportions of LDL and HDL are associated with cardiovascular disease by promoting atheroma development in arteries (atherosclerosis).

This disease process leads to myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke and peripheral vascular disease. As high LDL contributes to this process, it is termed "bad cholesterol", while high levels of HDL ("good cholesterol") offer a degree of protection. The balance can be redressed with exercise, a healthy diet, and sometimes medication.

For more information visit: http://www.hypercet.com

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